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Friday’s Library Snapshot

October 25, 2013

When I learned that Michael Harvey had died recently, I did a little research and am able to post a few images to celebrate his place in our Special Collections.

Michael Harvey (1931-2013) was already typographer and teacher, his work seen in cathedrals and the National Gallery, when he was inspired by Eric Gill’s Autobiography (1940) to become a letter carver.  In 1955 joined Reynolds Stone, the wood engraver to help him carve inscriptions in slate and stone; in particular the inscription on the memorial he had designed for the politician and writer Duff Cooper.

In 1957 he began designing lettered book jackets for several publishers.  From 1961 he taught at Bournemouth and Poole School of Art & Design.

The Ludlow Typograph Company in Chicago released his first typeface in 1964. Since then he designed typefaces for Monotype, Adobe, The Dutch Type Library and others.  From 1980 he taught in Europe and South Africa; also in the United States where calligraphy had become very popular.



Further reading and images from

Lettering design ; form & skill in the design and use of letters by Michael Harvey foreword by John Ryder

Reynolds Stone ; engraved lettering in wood by Michael Harvey

Letters of Aldous Huxley edited by Grover Smith, Jacket design Michael Harvey

Adventures with letters : a memoir by Michael Harvey, Jacket design Michael Harvey

4 Comments leave one →
  1. October 25, 2013 4:04 pm

    Most interesting post; thanks!

  2. Eternal Magpie permalink
    October 26, 2013 7:18 pm

    Michael Harvey used to teach me when I was a typography student, I have very fond memories of him being a very quiet, patient teacher. His work, whether it was letter carving in stone, calligraphy or typeface design, was always beautiful.

    • October 26, 2013 7:28 pm

      Wow!! what a claim to fame … I honour you!! _/\_ thanks for sharing xxx

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