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Alphabe Thursday …. J is for the walking of James Joyce

January 22, 2015

James Joyce ( 1882 – 1941) poet and novelist,we understand was known to have developed the style called the stream of consciousness. In his novel Ulysses, the jumble of thoughts and recollections of his characters unfolded best while he was walking.  He saw the long distance walk as an easy way to find a narrative continuity. Joyce managed to write one of the greatest novels of the 20th century about a pudgy advertising salesman trudging the streets of Dublin. 

10 Comments leave one →
  1. January 22, 2015 7:07 am

    I must try Joyce one day, but the stream of consciousness stuff does sound a little off-putting. I feel I will have to be in the right mood…perhaps walking around Dublin as I read would do the trick 🙂

  2. January 22, 2015 3:32 pm

    Great post ~ very informative and love the photos!

    Happy Weekend coming to you,
    artmusedog and carol

  3. January 22, 2015 4:08 pm

    I read Joyce years ago and enjoyed his style. Thanks for the background knowledge!

  4. January 22, 2015 11:35 pm

    You’ve got me wanting to read Ulysses now. I like the image of Joyce walking to write his tale.

  5. January 24, 2015 3:00 pm

    I remember reading Joyce in high school – didn’t know that was what it was know as. Not sure if I would enjoy it now. {:-D

    • January 24, 2015 3:22 pm

      Yes I know what you mean … but having read it before … you could dip in … a bit more comfortable xxx

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